19 days of not smoking...

Discussion in 'Chit Chat' started by JayCeeS, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. JayCeeS

    JayCeeS The Alpacas Are After Me

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    And I am losing my mind...

    I have smoked cigarettes for 28 years, never tried to quit till 19 days ago and just decided I am done buying them, no patches, gum or squat, just cold turkey quit. I'm not giving up on quitting, just want to whine and rant a little



    I hate the world right now
     
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  2. doubt

    doubt Tazmanian

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    19 battles won!:tup:
    The end of war is not far.
     
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  3. MarkFL

    MarkFL La Villa Strangiato

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    I've been there...it is hell on Earth...best of luck to you. :D
     
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  4. Anton Chigurh

    Anton Chigurh Ultimate Badass

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    This is for smokers no matter what the plant is - it IS dangerous to your health! You are inhaling products of combustion which without fail contain carbon monoxide (CO) and countless compounds and chemicals released by combustion.

    CO alone is a huge killer - your hemoglobin likes it 100 times more than it likes oxygen. And it builds up and stays in your system, displacing oxygen. Low blood-oxygen levels destroy tissue and cells.

    The chemicals and compounds in plant combustion smoke can change the way your thyroid works, which controls your disposal of LDL cholesterol. When the thyroid doesn't make the right amount of thyroxin, LDL builds up leading to clogged coronary arteries and an early sudden death by heart attack. Regardless of your diet or exercise routine.

    The "addictive" compounds in plant smoke are pretty much harmless by themselves, other than the addictive factor itself. It's the products of combustion that kill either by heart attack, cancer or both.

    Just stop it no matter what it is. Inhaling smoke, ANY smoke, is deadly and WILL eventually catch up with you.
     
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  5. fixer

    fixer I'm In My Prime

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    it sucks ive been “quitted” for 15 years and still want a cigarette right now

    if i ever got a terminal illness my first stop would be tabacco store and second stop a church :D

    how i quit was switching to snus for a couple years then quit from there
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2018
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  6. fixer

    fixer I'm In My Prime

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    you have to break the habit and the addiction switching to snus gives you your nicotine so you only fight one demon at a time
     
  7. Anton Chigurh

    Anton Chigurh Ultimate Badass

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    People quit without crutches, all the time. It's only truly tough for the first month or so. But it is definitely tough.

    I have a 3 pack a day friend who quit using vape. I have another, super casual cigarette smoker (maybe one or two cigarettes a day) but who was a super chronic weed smoker who just put it all down and walked away. Both had suffered heart attacks at young ages, 46 and 48 respectively. Both had hypothyroidism caused by inhaling combustants, which caused their heart attacks. It wasn't the nicotine or the THC, it was the products of combustion.

    If you like nicotine a good safe way to get it is with the Nicorrette lozenges. Or the gum. But they're expensive.

    My vaping friend makes his own vape juice, he buys liquid nicotine by the freaking quart. It's not regulated at all.
     
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  8. zappaDPJ

    zappaDPJ Administrator

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    I gave up after smoking for 35+ years. I chose to use Varenicline (Champix) to ease the pain as it appeared to give the best long term results. I haven't had a cigarette in nearly 8 years and I've finally lost the desire to light up.

    I feel your pain but I also know the pain from smoking related, bladder cancer so stick with it. I wish you the best of luck!
     
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  9. PoetJC

    PoetJC ♠ Jacquii: Black Kween of Hearts ♠

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    I was 428 pounds and had a consultation with a bariatric surgeon. This was June 20, 2008. He told me that I was a perfect candidate for the gastric bypass surgery, however, under no circumstances would he offer me the operation as a smoker. So that day on June 20, 2008 was the day of what I called "my last smoked cigarette" ... Cold turkey. No gum. No patches. No crutches. I had the surgery on June 28, 2009 ... So I applaud you for your 19 days JayCeeSJayCeeS. It's tough. And I'd quite smoking for close to 10 years. Unfortunately - I'm dealing with a lot of personal issues and started smoking again near the end of 2017.

    It's a tough habit to break. In order to be successful in breaking the habit - you have to absolutely WANT to do so. If you truly have a desire to be a non-smoker - then you'll likely to succeed. If you have no real desire to be a non-smoker - then you'll likely fail. I've found that my addiction is more mental than physical. Smoking cigarettes -- even though it's a nasty nasty habit and actually a stimulate -- does calm my anxiety a bit. IDK.. Perhaps I'm making an excuse. Eh... Not really - because at this point in time - I have absolutely no desire to be a non-smoker.

    But again - I applaud the hell outta ya OP. Congrats and here's wishing you success as a non-smoker.
    Cheers from Tennessee.

    J.
     
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  10. remton

    remton Neophyte

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    Just keep goin on! ;)
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Administrator

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    Grats JayCeeSJayCeeS

    It’s been 4 months since I lit up tomorrow. I can say you’re likely more addicted to the action of smoking than the nicotine itself, so anything you can do to keep yourself busy will help. I smoked for 27 years so I’m right there with you, tough to kick it but well worth it.

    2 weeks after not smoking I went and purchased nice mountain bike to reward myself.
     
  12. zappaDPJ

    zappaDPJ Administrator

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  13. Craigles700

    Craigles700 Participant

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    One of the hardest thing I had to do was quit smoking. 30 years almost to the day.

    Keep up the great work!
     
  14. ripptech

    ripptech Professional Lurker

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    going on 7 yrs here. you can do it. I still once and a while think "hey I want a smo... no. no I don't."
     
  15. zappaDPJ

    zappaDPJ Administrator

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    It took me 8 years to lose that feeling completely so you've only another year to go :D
     
  16. JayCeeS

    JayCeeS The Alpacas Are After Me

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    I've still not lit up, want to off and on, more so in the evenings. I just kick on my PS4 and some tunes and forget it
     
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  17. Craigles700

    Craigles700 Participant

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    I can't remember how many dreams I had had after I quit. The dreams were of me going to the pub the boys and, and naturally smoking. I remember waking up mad at myself thinking I actually did, only to realize it was a dream.

    The mind will play games.
     
  18. Solidus

    Solidus Stupid machines!

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    Just over 3 years now for me, e-cigarettes made it so easy.
     
  19. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Senior Citizen

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    JayCeeSJayCeeS Congratulations. See my avatar? That's a nasal cannula supplying me with a steady stream of oxygen. I have to wear it 24/7 for the rest of my life - and that life is much shorter than it would have been if I had quit smoking the first time I quit smoking. I don't know how many times I had to quit smoking. It was a LOT of times over my 35 years of smoking, which began in high school and the last time I quit was around the year 2000. I don't know for sure, just that it was one of my birthdays.

    All my girlfriends smoked. Sometime before I quit the last time I had fallen for a woman that didn't smoke. She and I were very good friends, but when I let her know I was interested in more, she was alarmingly candid, telling me she wasn't interested in being intimate with someone who always smelled like stale cigarettes - and whose car smelled like old cigs and whose house reeked of smoke and she couldn't imagine ever wanting to kiss a guy the second time who tasted like old cigarettes. I was crushed, but she was so right. It was a time of my life where I was also concerned about the increasing odor of putrid smoke everywhere.

    I managed to quit the last time using pills and patches exactly how they were prescribed by a doctor friend. I didn't get that girl, but I began dating another... who smoked. That lasted a very short time because I came to understand just what my friend said. There were other women and none smoked.

    During a period of time that I was doing well financially, was a well regarded local businessman and was secure enough in my 6 or 7 years abstention from smoking, while taking a second job as a writer and club promoter in the exotic dancer field, those years of active smoking came back to slap me down. I had a heart attack while helping a friend load lumber in his truck. It was very mild, I didn't know it was a heart attack, but it knocked me out for a few minutes and I woke up in the truck on the way to the hospital.

    I was released that night, but in a period of just 2 weeks of test after test, poking and prodding, I was sitting in my doctor's office when a nurse wheeled in one of those tall oxygen tanks on wheels. I cried like a baby; I knew exactly what that meant. Even though I traded the tall tank for shorter ones I could carry in a backpack, I was still the guy on oxygen. My business dried up, I wasn't as effective in my second job, some of my friends stopped coming around and it put a serious strain on my family.

    All those labels on cigarette packs meant nothing to me. The cancer ads on TV weren't enough, even my father dying in 1973 of the same disease I have now wasn't enough to make me be serious about quitting. I'm not positive, but I wonder if it would have made a difference if someone would have told me many years before that skills I spent years developing and making money at would evaporate, activities I enjoyed doing would become major struggles, girls wouldn't want to be with me and that sex with a beautiful woman would become a faded memory.

    Don't get me wrong, there is joy in my life. While I have a lung disease that will finally take my life before it should, I just celebrated my 69th birthday when doctors told me I might not reach 60. I recently started a total bathroom remodel project - well, that 2-week project has taken 3 months so far and not done yet, but I love every creative minute of it. I've learned how to do many new things and brushed off some old hobbies and adapted them to my limitations. 'Course, being without a woman to love... being able to only take a shower 2 or 3 times a week isn't so bad if you don't have a significant other to cuddle up to.

    One reality I have to deal with: even after 18 years of being smoke free, I still find myself thinking a smoke might be nice or wondering if they still make my brand anymore. Sick, I know. But it's a fleeting thought and they don't happen very often, but I'm on guard when they do. I hope my words have helped you - whoever is reading this. Go a day without smoking, then go another and another. One day at a time, sometimes one hour at a time. Think about the things you most enjoy. Think about losing all of them. Think about struggling for breath doing the most common things, like taking a shower, walking out to the mailbox. Think about how good you'll look with a hose in your nose 24/7.
     
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  20. Joeychgo

    Joeychgo TAZ Administrator

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    Lets hope you hang on for a good long while Jim.
     
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